photo by jon nicholson

news - New Report – Demand the Supply: Ranking Consumer Electronics and Jewelry Retail Companies on their Efforts to Develop Conflict-Free Minerals Supply Chains from Congo

november 16th, 2017

Note: This blog originally appeared on enoughproject.org.


Today, Enough released its latest company rankings report. The report, “Demand the Supply: Ranking Consumer Electronics and Jewelry Retail Companies on their Efforts to Develop Conflict-Free Minerals Supply Chains from Congo,” by Advocacy Manager Annie Callaway, examines what 20 of the largest companies in the world are doing to source conflict-free minerals and support peace in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

For decades, activists and affected communities in Congo have called attention to the links between their country’s minerals and its protracted armed conflicts. To many communities historically impacted by the violence and lawlessness surrounding Congo’s gold, tin, tungsten, and tantalum mines, the need for change is clear.

As a result of the unique leverage they have over their supply chains, the multinational companies that profit from Congo’s minerals have a central role to play in addressing the links between conflict and mining.

The 2017 conflict minerals company rankings examine 20 of the largest companies, as defined by market capitalization, in two of the industries which consume the most tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold: consumer electronics and jewelry retail. Although a range of industries use these minerals—often referred to as conflict minerals or 3TG—Enough chose to rank these two industries in particular because they have demonstrated the potential to be catalytic in the development of new policies and practices regarding responsible sourcing, and they are also particularly attuned to consumer pressure. These latest rankings acknowledge the steady advances that have been made since Enough conducted its first company rankings in 2010 and expose the considerable and urgent need for more action.

Read the full blog here to learn more about the report.

 

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