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Drawing upon the voices of cultural leaders to protect and assist the vulnerable, marginalized, and displaced.

 

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last update: july 25th, 2017

july 20th, 2017

A Question of Leadership: Addressing a Dangerous Crisis in Sudan’s SPLM-N

 

Note: This report is published by the Enough Project.

 

A worsening recent political divide within the leadership of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N, or “movement”), traditionally based in South Kordofan and Blue Nile (the “Two Areas”), is increasingly likely to lead to a change of leadership of the movement. Of grave concern, the political divide has already led to violent clashes with strong ethnic undertones between units of the movement’s armed wing (the Sudan People’s Liberation Army-North, the SPLA-N) in parts of Sudan’s Blue Nile state that are controlled by the movement and in camps hosting refugees from Blue Nile just across the border in South Sudan’s Upper Nile state.

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june 15th, 2017

Yes, We Have Leverage: A Playbook for Immediate and Long-Term Financial Pressures to Address Violent Kleptocracies in East and Central Africa

 

Note: This policy brief was first published on the Enough Project website.

 

“We have no leverage.” “All of this leader’s money is parked elsewhere in Africa, in Dubai, or Europe.” “Sanctions do not work.”

These are just a few of the views one often hears from observers of crises in Africa and, more worryingly, senior U.S. and foreign diplomats assigned to try to resolve them. Through the Enough Project’s engagement with these officials, my colleagues and I regularly encounter such opinions. It is increasingly clear to us that there is a broad lack of familiarity with the array of tools that policymakers have at their disposal to address seemingly intractable conflicts or murderous warlords. These tools have not been a consistent part of the policy discussion concerning how to resolve crises, or when they have, the institutional barriers to action have been too high. So it is no wonder those tools are often used improperly, ineffectively, or not at all.

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NEWS

last updated november 28th, 2016

november 28th, 2016

Sudan: Civil Disobedience Campaign Continues as Economic Crisis Looms

“Your country is burning and being looted and people are now living in [a] dire situation where there is no medicine.”– Sudanese protester interviewed by Al-Jazeera on November 27, 2016

 

Civil Disobedience Campaign

 

Sunday marked the first day in a three-day civil disobedience campaign across Sudan. Although the Sudanese government dismissed the level of participation as insignificant, local reporting in Khartoum shows that many Sudanese people joined in the first day of this campaign. Numerous shops remained closed in Khartoum and Omdurman and many parents kept their children home from school. Although the government tried to portraySundayas a typical day in Khartoum, the difference was evident in the lack of automobile and pedestrian traffic in normally congested areas. As one driver in Khartoum’s largest public transportation station said in theSudan Tribune: “the streets are empty as if the country is on a holiday.”

 

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november 21st, 2016

As Warnings of Genocide in South Sudan Increase, U.S. to Introduce UNSC Resolution for Targeted Sanctions, Arms Embargo

On November 17, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power announced that the United States will introduce a resolution in the U.N. Security Council for targeted sanctions and an arms embargo for South Sudan. In her remarks at a U.N. Security Council meeting on the situation in South Sudan, she said:

 

“Let us not treat the leaders of South Sudan as though they are responsible and credible interlocutors, but engage them as the cynical actors that they, unfortunately, have shown themselves to be – too often putting their short-sighted personal interests over the welfare of millions of their own people who are suffering... Let us stop acting as if the principle of sovereignty, as critical as it is to the functioning of the international order, as if that principle gives the South Sudanese Government – or any government – license to commit mass atrocities against its own people, or to fuel a humanitarian crisis that has left millions of lives hanging in the balance.”

 

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november 17th, 2016

New Policy Brief: “Five Lessons from a Sanctions Practitioner”

Today, NOOW partner The Enough Project released a policy brief, “Five Lessons from a Sanctions Practitioner,” by renowned threat finance specialist Peter Harrell. The brief argues that, done right, sanctions can have enormous impact.

 

Follow the jump for a link to the brief.

october 27th, 2016

New Comprehensive Study: "A Criminal State: Understanding and Countering Institutionalized Corruption and Violence in Congo"

Today, NOOW partner The Enough Project released a new comprehensive study, "A Criminal State: Understanding and Countering Institutionalized Corruption and Violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo," by Sasha Lezhnev. The study, the second report in the the "Violent Kleptocracy: Corruption and Conflict in East and Central Africa" series, details how Congo is not a failed state—for everyone. It is a failure for the vast majority of Congolese who suffer from abysmal security, healthcare, and education services. However, it is an efficient state for ruling elites and their commercial partners who seek to extract or traffic resources at the expense of Congo’s development. Over the past 130 years, Congo has had many elements of violent kleptocracy, a system of state capture in which ruling networks and commercial partners hijack governing institutions and maintain impunity for the purpose of resource extraction and for the security of the regime. Violence has been the systemic companion of these regimes. This study argues that President Kabila and his close associates rely in large part on theft, violence, and impunity to stay in power at the expense of the country’s development. If international policymakers are to have a real impact in helping Congolese reformers actually reform the system, they need to shift the lens through which they view the conflict.

 

Click to read the report.

october 10th, 2016

New Report: "Khartoum’s Economic Achilles’ Heel: The intersection of war, profit, and greed"

Today, NOOW partner The Enough Project released a new report, “Bankrupting Kleptocracy: Financial Tools to Counter Atrocities in Africa’s Deadliest War Zones,” by J.R. Mailey and Jacinth Planer. The report describes how the state in several conflict-affected countries in East and Central Africa has been hijacked and transformed from an institution that is supposed to provide social services and safeguard the rule of law into a predatory criminal enterprise that does quite the opposite. The international community has the power to chip away at the environment of impunity that characterizes these violent kleptocracies—and the United States is in a position to play a leading role.

 

Click through for a link to the report.

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