photo by jon nicholson
photo by jon nicholson

FOUNDERS

Don Cheadle

George Clooney

Matt Damon

Brad Pitt

David Pressman

Jerry Weintraub

 

Drawing upon the voices of cultural leaders to protect and assist the vulnerable, marginalized, and displaced.

 

Not On Our Watch is a federally registered 501(c)3 charity.

# Added button sentry (Case 43265) to start page

feature stories

last update: march 16th, 2017

march 9th, 2017

South Sudan’s government-made famine

This op-ed originally appeared in the Washington Post, and was written by the co-founders of the Sentry, George Clooney and John Prendergast.

 

Official, U.N.-declared famines are a rare phenomenon. The last one worldwide was six years ago, in Somalia. Famines are declared officially when people have already begun to starve to death. It is the diplomatic equivalent of a seven-alarm fire. That is where the youngest country in the world, South Sudan, finds itself today, as 100,000 face immediate starvation and another 1 million are on its brink.

[read more]

february 20th, 2017

British Banks are Go-betweens in Global Conflict. This can be Stopped.

Note: This op-ed originally appeared in the Guardian and was written by The Sentry's co-founders George Clooney and John Prendergast.

 

Almost a year ago, the UK government convened a global summit to commit to fighting corruption. The final communiqué from the governments involved summed up their historic intentions: “We want to send a clear signal to the corrupt that they will face consequences internationally. We want to make it harder for them to travel and do business in our countries.”

[read more]

NEWS

last updated april 8th, 2016

april 8th, 2016

U.S. News & World Report: "Could the Iran Model Work for Sudan?"

The Obama administration should look to its successful sanctions regime and subsequent diplomacy with Iran as a model for ending violence in Sudan, according toa new report by NOOW partner, advocacy organization Enough Project.

 

Click to continue reading.

april 6th, 2016

Report: A New Approach to Sudan Sanctions

Today, NOOW partner the Enough Project released its latest report, “Modernized Sanctions for Sudan: Unfinished Business for the Obama Administration,” co-authored by NOOW board member John Prendergast and Brad Brooks-Rubin.

 

Click to continue reading, and to find out how you can take action.

march 22nd, 2016

Djibouti Corruption Case Dismissed by UK Courts

A U.K. court recently dismissed a claim made by the Government of Djibouti against a powerful businessman who had fallen out of favor with the government. The politically-connected businessman, Abdourahman Mohamed Mahmoud Boreh, is credited with playing an integral role in the development of the nation’s ports, oil storage, and duty free facilities. The government is petitioning for control of these facilities that are currently owned by Dubai-based DP World and other subsidiaries. Its argument rests in how bribery and fraudulent agreements for consultancy payments infringe upon investment and infrastructure agreements that are already in effect. Justice Flaux asserted that the legal proceedings were jumpstarted by Boreh’s lack of support for the president running for a third term, noting a break in their former friendship.

 

Follow the jump to read further. 

march 21st, 2016

Wildlife Trafficking and Poaching - A Threat to Animals, Atrocity Prevention, and Transparency

Thursday, March 3rd 2016 was World Wildlife Day. This year, with the theme of protection of elephants in particular and recognizing the links between wildlife trafficking and the perpetration of atrocities in central and eastern Africa, NOOW partner The Enough Project is calling on U.S. Congress to pass critical anti-wildlife trafficking legislation.

 

Click through to learn more, and to make your voice heard and take action.

march 17th, 2016

South African Court Rejects Impunity: “Decision Not to Arrest Bashir Inconsistent with Law”

Earlier this week, South Africa’s Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) rejected the government’s appeal of a lower court decision over its failure to arrest suspected international criminal and Sudan President Omar al-Bashir. Bashirtraveledto South Africa last June to attend an African Union (AU) summit. The lower courtheld that the government violated South African law by allowing Bashir to leave the country before a court could rule on whether South African officials should arrest him due to his two outstanding International Criminal Court (ICC) arrest warrants.

 

Click to continue reading.

Privacy Policy and Terms of Use