photo by jon nicholson
photo by jon nicholson

FOUNDERS

Don Cheadle

George Clooney

Matt Damon

Brad Pitt

David Pressman

Jerry Weintraub

 

Drawing upon the voices of cultural leaders to protect and assist the vulnerable, marginalized, and displaced.

 

Not On Our Watch is a federally registered 501(c)3 charity.

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feature stories

last update: july 8th, 2016

june 21st, 2016

Board Member John Prendergast Op-Ed: "Congo's Kabila Problem"

This op-ed, co-authored by board member John Prendergast, originally appeared in Foreign Affairs.

 

In July of last year, U.S. President Barack Obama gave a landmark speech at the African Union (AU) headquarters in Addis Ababa, criticizing leaders who undemocratically change their constitutions to stay in power and emphasizing that the United States would call out such behavior. He pointed to Burundi where a few months earlier, President Pierre Nkurunziza pressured the courts to change the constitution’s term limits so that he could run for a third time. Obama warned that such a tactic could trigger “instability and strife,” as well as hamper “Africa’s democratic progress.” But his words seem to have fallen on deaf ears.

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april 24th, 2016

Board Member George Clooney to Present Inaugural Aurora Prize Today in Armenia

Update: the award event has concluded. You can watch the full recording at the livestream link; Clooney's remarks begin at the 2:08 mark.

 

Board members George Clooney and John Prendergast are in Yerevan, Armenia today, where Clooney will present the inaugural Aurora Prize, honoring an individual who puts her- or himself at risk to enable others to survive. The board members are likewise commemorating the anniversary of the Armenian Genocide.

 

 

Click through for a link to the livestream of the award event (beginning @ 1pm EST), as well as the text of Clooney's remarks.

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NEWS

last updated march 11th, 2016

march 11th, 2016

Hunger in Sudan: Government Policy, Civilian Suffering

Hunger and food insecurity have been far too common in Sudan. As severe drought and famine swept through East Africa in the 1980s, the Sudanese acutely felt the effects of these deprivations. Darfur, in particular, was one of the most drought-affected regions. About 20 years later, at least 180,000 Sudanese died from hunger and related disease during the Darfur genocide in 2003 and 2004. Many that survived the conflict still live in IDP camps, where daily life is incredibly difficult, especially for vulnerable groups such as women and children, who sometimes go the entire day without eating.

 

Click to continue reading.

march 3rd, 2016

World Wildlife Day 2016: Blood Ivory - The Elephant in the Room

Thursday, March 3rd 2016 is World Wildlife Day. This year, the theme centers on protection of elephants in particular. Recognizing the links between wildlife trafficking and the perpetration of atrocities in central and eastern Africa, NOOW partner The Enough Project is calling on U.S. Congress to pass critical anti-wildlife trafficking legislation.

 

Click through to learn more, and to make your voice heard and take action.

february 24th, 2016

UN Peacekeepers’ Role Questioned in Wake of Mass Killings in Malakal

Following the deaths of 18 civilians in a displaced people’s camp run by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) in the city of Malakal on February 18, reporters are beginning to piece together details on the incident.

 

Follow the jump to read further.

february 22nd, 2016

South Sudan’s Central Bank Demands Accountability for U.S. Dollar Auction

Soon after South Sudan devalued its currency in December 2015, the central bank authorized the auction of U.S dollars to commercial banks to offset the cost of devaluation, which had caused the South Sudanese pound to lose its value by 84 percent. Millions of dollars were auctioned to the commercial banks as a result of this move.

 

Click to continue reading.

 

february 12th, 2016

South Sudan Mismanagement Fuels “Toxic” Crisis

As conditions for ordinary South Sudanese people continue to deteriorate, government mismanagement is combining with economic and political crises to create a “toxic situation,” according to a newly published briefing report by NOOW partner the Enough Project.

 

The report, “Addressing South Sudan’s Economic and Fiscal Crisis,” calls for action by the international community, and also for commitment by the warring parties to put the needs of the people ahead of their own. The country’s population currently suffers from severe shortages of food, fuel, and medical supplies.

 

Follow the jump for a summary, as well as a link to the full report.

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