photo by jon nicholson
photo by jon nicholson

FOUNDERS

Don Cheadle

George Clooney

Matt Damon

Brad Pitt

David Pressman

Jerry Weintraub

 

Drawing upon the voices of cultural leaders to protect and assist the vulnerable, marginalized, and displaced.

 

Not On Our Watch is a federally registered 501(c)3 charity.

# Added button sentry (Case 43265) to start page

feature stories

last update: january 19th, 2017

january 18th, 2017

MODERNIZE, DON’T REMOVE, SUDAN’S SANCTIONS

This op-ed was originally published in The Hill and co-authored by board member John Prendergast.

Through modernized and biting financial pressure, the new administration has a real chance to use existing and new leverage to alter the deadly status quo that has led to the deaths of millions of Sudanese people over the past 25 years.

[read more]

november 21st, 2016

Board Members George Clooney and John Prendergast Economist Op-Ed: "Stop the Cash, Stop the Conflict"

This op-ed was originally published in The Economist, and co-authored by board members George Clooney and John Prendergast.

 

Tackling corruption is the key to peace in South Sudan and beyond, argue George Clooney and John Prendergast, co-founders, The Sentry

 

The world’s newest country, South Sudan, could have been holding its first free elections in 2017. Instead, it faces another year of strife. In the latest phase of the cyclical conflict that has plagued its people for decades, tens of thousands have died, 5m people face hunger or starvation and 1m have become refugees. Yet cleverer global action—especially involving Western banks—can stop the rot.

[read more]

NEWS

last updated september 25th, 2015

september 25th, 2015

Papal Address to Congress: The Role of Money in Conflict

In his September 24 speech to a joint session of Congress, Pope Francis discussed the arms trade and illicit funding operations that drive conflict. Neither NOOW or its partner The Enough Project are affiliated with any religion or sect, but given their joint work with The Sentry, both organizations took note of the Pope's landmark speech in D.C. He questioned the mechanisms of and reasoning for weapons trade with violent regimes and armed groups, utilizing this platform to condemn such practices.

 

Follow the link to read the relevant portions of his statement.

september 23rd, 2015

NGOs Push African Union Chair for Action on South Sudan Ahead of AU Peace and Security Council Meeting

In a letter to the African Union (AU) chairperson, Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, NOOW partner the Enough Project joined with 37 South Sudanese and international organizations, urging that the meeting should be used to support the establishment of an AU commission-created hybrid court for South Sudan. The court would try grave crimes committed in the country’s recent conflict, as provided for in the August peace agreement between the parties to the conflict. The organizations also urged Dlamini Zuma to help ensure the long-awaited publication of the report by the AU Commission of Inquiry on South Sudan.

 

Read the letter after the jump.

september 15th, 2015

Join Entourage Star Emmanuelle Chriqui for a Night Out in Hollywood

UPDATE: This Omaze raffle has now ended. Thank you to all those who entered for your support.

 

Entourage actor and Enough Project upstander Emmanuelle Chriqui wants to fly you and a friend to Hollywood to join her for a night out on the town. It only costs $10 to enter, and the funds benefit The Enough Project’s Raise Hope for Congo campaign.

 

Follow the link to enter before the September 25th deadline.

september 15th, 2015

NGOs Urge UN Security Council to Impose Targeted Sanctions and Arms Embargo in South Sudan

NOOW partner The Enough Project, along with Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, have sent letters to the United Nations Security Council, asking them to fulfill their commitment to impose sanctions on individuals who have committed abuses against civilians in South Sudan and calling for an arms embargo.

 

Follow the jump to read the letter.

september 8th, 2015

Foreign Policy: "South Sudan’s Peace Deal Never Stood a Chance"

Foreign Policy examines taking new, tougher measures against leaders in South Sudan.

 

In the middle of a hot, clear day on Aug. 21, roughly 2,000 people packed around the John Garang Mausoleum in downtown Juba to shout down the latest deal to end South Sudan’s nearly two-year-long war. Organized by the government, it was an event for true believers, those somehow insulated from the economic ravages of the war: young boys and girls in school uniform, men in suits, and women in colorful dresses. As a DJ sang over pre-recorded music blaring on massive speakers, praising South Sudan and its president, Salva Kiir, participants held large signs written in English declaring “one army, not two” and “no regime change through violence.”

Privacy Policy and Terms of Use