photo by jon nicholson
photo by jon nicholson


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George Clooney

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Drawing upon the voices of cultural leaders to protect and assist the vulnerable, marginalized, and displaced.


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last update: march 25th, 2010

march 25th, 2010

Executive Director Alex Wagner Op-Ed: "The Curious Case of Nyi Nyi Aung"

"Six months ago, a man named Nyi Nyi Aung landed at the Yangon International Airport in Burma. He had come to Burma in the hopes of visiting his mother, who is currently in jail for pro-democracy activities and sick with cancer. Before he could clear customs, Aung's baggage cart was seized by airport personnel and he was told to come into their offices to answer some "personal questions." Although Aung has a background as a human rights activist, and was a prominent leader during Burma's 1988 uprising, he had broken no laws. Perhaps more importantly, Aung is also an American citizen, which should have provided some insurance against wrongful incarceration."

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march 22nd, 2010

Report: "Current Realities and Future Possibilities in Burma: Options for US Policy"

"As the Obama administration turns to the thorny issue of engaging Burma’s authoritarian government, a new Asia Society Task Force report offers a detailed strategy that positions the United States to respond effectively and flexibly to the twists and turns that a potential transition in Burma may take over time. The stakes are high. With Burma’s military leaders preparing to convene elections later this year, a comprehensive U.S. approach—taken in concert with regional and international partners—provides the best hope for bringing Burma into the world community. The Task Force’s report, entitled Current Realities and Future Possibilities in Burma: Options for U.S. Policy, recommends framing U.S. policy toward Burma based on changes taking place in the country with careful consideration of how the instruments at its disposal, including both the engagement and sanctions sides of the equation, can be tapped to encourage political and economic reform."


Follow the jump for further information about the report.

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last updated march 21st, 2018

march 21st, 2018

U.S. Takes Action against South Sudanese Public and Private Oil Entities

Note: This statment was originally published on


March 21, 2018 (Washington, DC) – Today, the United States announced it was taking action against 15 South Sudanese oil-related entities “whose revenues have contributed to the ongoing crisis in South Sudan.” U.S. as well as non-U.S. companies will now need a license to export, re-export, or transfer exports of any U.S.-origin goods or technology to the listed entities.

march 19th, 2018

The Sentry Brings Aboard OFAC Corruption and Human Rights Targeting Chief Joshua White as Director of Policy and Analysis


Note: This press release originally appeared on

The Sentry is pleased to announce its new Director of Policy and Analysis, Joshua White.

White joins The Sentry after eight years with the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), where he was most recently the first Chief for Human Rights and Corruption in its targeting division.

march 8th, 2018

Sharing Emi Mahmoud’s Dreams for Peace on International Women’s Day 2018


Note: This blog was originally posted on


Thursday, March 8th, 2018 is International Women’s Day. At The Enough Project, we focus on countries in East and Central Africa where women and girls are too often the victims of brutal and devastating violence. However, these women and girls are also at the forefront crucial initiatives pushing for peace, inclusion, and transparency in their respective countries. Last month, we had the honor of featuring Darfuri activist and poet Emi Mahmoud at the Lemkin Summit to End Genocide and Mass Atrocities. In honor of this year’s International Women’s Day, we are continuing to highlight and amplify her work.

march 8th, 2018

Red Flags in DR Congo’s Electoral Process: Time for Consequences


Note: This blog originally appeared on

Although the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo promised to hold elections by the end of this year, there are strong warning signs that a credible democratic transition is at risk. Now is a key moment for the United States, African states, and Europe to influence that process and get the country back on track. In its 58-year history, the Democratic Republic of the Congo has yet to have a peaceful transfer of power through democratic elections. Current President Joseph Kabila’s term of office expired in December 2016, but his government has repeatedly failed to hold elections. Each time the Kabila administration delays elections, it trots out a smoke screen of technical excuses, and some of these are the government’s own making. The true reason Congo has not held elections is lack of political will – because the will rests principally with the financial interests of those in power.

february 28th, 2018

Activists Take to Washington D.C. for the 2018 Lemkin Summit


Note: This blog originally appeared on


The 2018 Lemkin Summit to End Genocide and Mass Atrocities brought together 160 activists and student leaders in the anti-atrocity movement for our largest summit to date. Hosted at American University, the 3-day Summit featured expert panels, activist skill training, and focused breakout sessions. Co-sponsored by the Enough Project and Jewish World Watch, participants networked with one another, engaged with guest speakers and learned new approaches to end and preventing mass atrocities in places such as the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan and Sudan. The Summit culminated with more than 75 meetings with congressional offices.

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