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photo by jon nicholson

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Drawing upon the voices of cultural leaders to protect and assist the vulnerable, marginalized, and displaced.

 

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last update: january 7th, 2010

january 7th, 2010

Report: "Rescuing the Peace in Southern Sudan"

"Major conflict could return to southern Sudan unless there is urgent international action to save the peace agreement that ended one of Africa’s longest and deadliest wars, ten aid agencies warned today.

 

In a new report “Rescuing the Peace in Southern Sudan” – released ahead of the fifth anniversary of the signing of the peace agreement between the Sudanese government and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement – the agencies said a lethal cocktail of rising violence, chronic poverty and political tensions has left the peace deal on the brink of collapse."

 

Follow the jump for a link to the report.

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october 26th, 2009

Executive Director Alex Wagner Op-Ed: "The Arrest and Torture of an American in Burma (And Why You Never Heard of Him)"

"While I was sitting in a Congressional House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on Burma on a beautiful fall day last week, a Burmese-born American citizen who happens to live thirty minutes from Capitol Hill was languishing in Rangoon's notorious Insein prison. The Burmese courts have charged this American, Kyaw Zaw Lwin, with fraud and forgery, though the ruling regime's official mouthpiece, the New Light of Myanmar, has also accused him of terrorist activities. Kyaw Zaw Lwin's defense counsel has said that his client was physically tortured during his detention and denied any allegations that he was plotting to incite unrest. Last week, his trial began."

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NEWS

last updated july 27th, 2017

july 27th, 2017

Pushing for Progress on Abyei

 

Learn more about the ongoing tensions in Abyei in the Enough Project's two-part blog series.

july 10th, 2017

Lifting sanctions will help Sudan’s leaders. What about everyone else?

 

Note: This op-ed originally appeared in Washington Post and was written by Tom Catena, the only doctor permanently based in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains; he is the laureate of the 2017 Aurora Prize for Awakening Humanity.

 

On most days, I don’t feel as though the daily debates or the deadlines set in Washington affect me much. Who’s up and who’s down, and who tweeted what at whom, just aren’t on my radar. But July 12 — the day by which the United States must decide whether to lift sanctions against the government of Sudan — is a day that I’ll be watching closely because it will affect me and the people I serve.

june 29th, 2017

7 U.S. Organizations Urge Secretary Tillerson to Consider Issues Relating to Religious Freedom and the Persecution of Religious Minorities in Sudan

 

Note: This letter originally appeared on the Enough Project website.

 

In a joint letter, seven U.S. organizations have urged Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to consider issues relating to religious freedom and the persecution of religious minorities in Sudan as part of any strategic review relating to U.S. policy.

june 27th, 2017

Reverse Course in South Sudan

 

This article originally appeared in U.S. News, and was written by the co-founder of the Sentry, John Prendergast.

 

As the grim tolls of death and destruction mount rapidly in South Sudan, the lack of any kind of coherent international peace strategy is becoming more and more painfully evident. The deadly zero-sum power struggle for control of the kleptocratic state machinery in Juba, South Sudan's capital, ensures that the imagination and political will for peace will not be forthcoming from the warring parties on their own. What is required is a unified approach involving neighboring states, the African Union, the United Nations and interested governments like the United States and United Kingdom.

june 20th, 2017

The Missing Track: The case for a new policy framework between the United States and Sudan

 

Note: This brief originally appeared on the Enough Project website.

 

In early July, the Trump administration is due to make a pivotal decision concerning Sudan: the administration could fully remove sweeping sanctions that were suspended in the waning days of the Obama administration, reinstate those sanctions, or delay that decision in order to gather more information and allow new appointees to take their seats before any conclusions are reached. This July decision point is part of a five-track plan that the Obama administration negotiated with Khartoum in an effort to achieve tangible progress on a limited set of issues: partnering on counterterrorism priorities, defeating the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), ending Sudanese support to South Sudanese armed opposition groups, enacting a cessation of hostilities, and expanding humanitarian access.

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