photo by jon nicholson
photo by jon nicholson

FOUNDERS

Don Cheadle

George Clooney

Matt Damon

Brad Pitt

David Pressman

Jerry Weintraub

 

Drawing upon the voices of cultural leaders to protect and assist the vulnerable, marginalized, and displaced.

 

Not On Our Watch is a federally registered 501(c)3 charity.

# Added button sentry (Case 43265) to start page

feature stories

last update: march 12th, 2010

march 12th, 2010

Wash. Post Op-Ed: "Burma shunned U.S. diplomacy with new election law. Now what?"

"President Obama took office hoping that constructive diplomacy could yield progress on some of the thorniest foreign-policy challenges facing the United States. Among these was Burma, a Southeast Asian nation of 50 million people that has been misruled into poverty, decline and perpetual warfare by a benighted military dictatorship. Mr. Obama did not abandon economic sanctions against the regime, but he did hold out the prospect of warmer relations if Burma's regime would show some sign of easing up on its people."

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january 15th, 2010

Not On Our Watch Donates $1Million to Emergency Medical Efforts in Haiti

In the wake of Tuesday’s devastating earthquake in Haiti, Not On Our Watch has directed $1 million (USD) in emergency response funds to provide medical services for victims of the disaster. The beneficiary of the grant, Partners In Health (PIH), presently has relief efforts underway providing emergency medical care for the wounded, and is addressing the critical shortage of hospitals and care centers destroyed during the disaster.

 

The founders of Not On Our Watch released the following statement: “The people of Haiti are in desperate need of help. Our organization, Not On Our Watch, will do whatever it can and we know the international community will as well."

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NEWS

last updated july 27th, 2017

july 27th, 2017

Pushing for Progress on Abyei

 

Learn more about the ongoing tensions in Abyei in the Enough Project's two-part blog series.

july 10th, 2017

Lifting sanctions will help Sudan’s leaders. What about everyone else?

 

Note: This op-ed originally appeared in Washington Post and was written by Tom Catena, the only doctor permanently based in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains; he is the laureate of the 2017 Aurora Prize for Awakening Humanity.

 

On most days, I don’t feel as though the daily debates or the deadlines set in Washington affect me much. Who’s up and who’s down, and who tweeted what at whom, just aren’t on my radar. But July 12 — the day by which the United States must decide whether to lift sanctions against the government of Sudan — is a day that I’ll be watching closely because it will affect me and the people I serve.

june 29th, 2017

7 U.S. Organizations Urge Secretary Tillerson to Consider Issues Relating to Religious Freedom and the Persecution of Religious Minorities in Sudan

 

Note: This letter originally appeared on the Enough Project website.

 

In a joint letter, seven U.S. organizations have urged Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to consider issues relating to religious freedom and the persecution of religious minorities in Sudan as part of any strategic review relating to U.S. policy.

june 27th, 2017

Reverse Course in South Sudan

 

This article originally appeared in U.S. News, and was written by the co-founder of the Sentry, John Prendergast.

 

As the grim tolls of death and destruction mount rapidly in South Sudan, the lack of any kind of coherent international peace strategy is becoming more and more painfully evident. The deadly zero-sum power struggle for control of the kleptocratic state machinery in Juba, South Sudan's capital, ensures that the imagination and political will for peace will not be forthcoming from the warring parties on their own. What is required is a unified approach involving neighboring states, the African Union, the United Nations and interested governments like the United States and United Kingdom.

june 20th, 2017

The Missing Track: The case for a new policy framework between the United States and Sudan

 

Note: This brief originally appeared on the Enough Project website.

 

In early July, the Trump administration is due to make a pivotal decision concerning Sudan: the administration could fully remove sweeping sanctions that were suspended in the waning days of the Obama administration, reinstate those sanctions, or delay that decision in order to gather more information and allow new appointees to take their seats before any conclusions are reached. This July decision point is part of a five-track plan that the Obama administration negotiated with Khartoum in an effort to achieve tangible progress on a limited set of issues: partnering on counterterrorism priorities, defeating the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), ending Sudanese support to South Sudanese armed opposition groups, enacting a cessation of hostilities, and expanding humanitarian access.

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