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photo by jon nicholson

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Drawing upon the voices of cultural leaders to protect and assist the vulnerable, marginalized, and displaced.

 

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last update: july 11th, 2017

june 22nd, 2017

The July Deadline Won’t Work: Why the U.S. needs to delay the decision on Sudan sanctions

 

Note: This policy brief was published by the Enough Project.

 

As a July decision approaches on whether to permanently remove most sanctions on Sudan, the Trump administration should properly evaluate progress, or lack thereof, on each of the five tracks on which progress is required, and the administration should not privilege any single track over others. Enough’s view is that the evidence available concerning multiple tracks is inconclusive. Combined with the fact that key senior Trump administration officials responsible for Africa policy are not yet in place, this calls for a six-month delay on the decision, during which time the Trump administration should assign the additional staff needed to gather credible information and assess progress on each of the five tracks. While properly assessing progress on the five tracks, the Trump administration should also pivot to pursue a separate new track of engagement focused on advancing peace and human rights in Sudan.

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may 31st, 2017

New Sentry Report – Making a Fortune While Making a Famine: The Illustrative Case of a South Sudanese General

 

Note: This report was published by Not On Our Watch's initiative, The Sentry.

 

Today, The Sentry published its latest report, Making a Fortune While Making a Famine: The Illustrative Case of a South Sudanese General. It examines documents concerning Lt. Gen. Malek Reuben Riak, who was recently promoted to deputy chief of defense staff, and is one of the senior generals that the U.N. Security Council’s Panel of Experts has identified as responsible for the violence in Unity state that directly led to the famine. A close examination of these documents helps illustrate the warped incentives that are presented to senior military officials in South Sudan.

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NEWS

last updated march 11th, 2016

march 11th, 2016

Hunger in Sudan: Government Policy, Civilian Suffering

Hunger and food insecurity have been far too common in Sudan. As severe drought and famine swept through East Africa in the 1980s, the Sudanese acutely felt the effects of these deprivations. Darfur, in particular, was one of the most drought-affected regions. About 20 years later, at least 180,000 Sudanese died from hunger and related disease during the Darfur genocide in 2003 and 2004. Many that survived the conflict still live in IDP camps, where daily life is incredibly difficult, especially for vulnerable groups such as women and children, who sometimes go the entire day without eating.

 

Click to continue reading.

march 3rd, 2016

World Wildlife Day 2016: Blood Ivory - The Elephant in the Room

Thursday, March 3rd 2016 is World Wildlife Day. This year, the theme centers on protection of elephants in particular. Recognizing the links between wildlife trafficking and the perpetration of atrocities in central and eastern Africa, NOOW partner The Enough Project is calling on U.S. Congress to pass critical anti-wildlife trafficking legislation.

 

Click through to learn more, and to make your voice heard and take action.

february 24th, 2016

UN Peacekeepers’ Role Questioned in Wake of Mass Killings in Malakal

Following the deaths of 18 civilians in a displaced people’s camp run by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) in the city of Malakal on February 18, reporters are beginning to piece together details on the incident.

 

Follow the jump to read further.

february 22nd, 2016

South Sudan’s Central Bank Demands Accountability for U.S. Dollar Auction

Soon after South Sudan devalued its currency in December 2015, the central bank authorized the auction of U.S dollars to commercial banks to offset the cost of devaluation, which had caused the South Sudanese pound to lose its value by 84 percent. Millions of dollars were auctioned to the commercial banks as a result of this move.

 

Click to continue reading.

 

february 12th, 2016

South Sudan Mismanagement Fuels “Toxic” Crisis

As conditions for ordinary South Sudanese people continue to deteriorate, government mismanagement is combining with economic and political crises to create a “toxic situation,” according to a newly published briefing report by NOOW partner the Enough Project.

 

The report, “Addressing South Sudan’s Economic and Fiscal Crisis,” calls for action by the international community, and also for commitment by the warring parties to put the needs of the people ahead of their own. The country’s population currently suffers from severe shortages of food, fuel, and medical supplies.

 

Follow the jump for a summary, as well as a link to the full report.

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